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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
girl may have been a target. and the treasures of scotland, the country's national museum will feature objects unseen for decades. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. taking it to the wire, that is what the u.s. congress is doing. next tuesday is the deadline for raising the country's debt ceiling or going into default. with five days to go the political shots are flying fast and furious. as the house of representatives gets ready to vote on a proposal the end game is far from clear, reason enough for the world's markets to worry. andrew north starts our coverage. >> fears of an american default are rippling worldwide. japan saw stocks plunge again. the u.s. congress, the battle goes on. some republican hard-liners are now backing their party's plan for a short-term increase in the debt limit, insisting americans are on their side. >> if he thinks he can do better, show us your plan mr. president. if the senate thinks they can do better, pass a bill. we are the only ones who passed a bill to resolve this debt crisis issue. we will pass a second one today. the
at the national museum of scotland. it's opening its doors tomorrow and our scotland correspondent has gone to have a look. >> this is a story of a restless people and a restless nation. scotland's heritage of invention and discovery put this small country on the map. the power of the steam engine revolutionized industry. the television changed the lives of millions. and scots sent back structures from afar. >> scots were great inventors and explore rers and colonial explorers were missionaries. in many ways the stories we tell here are in part the story of scotland's engagement with the rest of the world. >> there are much older tales like t-rex and the national history gallery. in here there are stories of survival and some of the exhibits themselves have survived for decade in the freezer. some date back to the 19th century. now they're being used again to teach the theory of evolution. charles darwin once lived on the site of the museum. he was just a student in scotland but this man's discovery for discoverying penicillin is a gem in they can electic museum. >> we have a chance to brin
of the world" also worked simultaneously, if you'll pardon the pun, as a translator for scotland yard. there was also somebody who was working both as the chief correspondent -- or chief reporter of the paper. as a police informant. so the -- there was almost no delineation at times between where news international finished around scland yard began. it was really extraordinary. >> rose: there was a headline,lm reuters saying, is britain more corrupt it thinks? >> i tnk we need to be careful before moving too far in that direction. this is not italy. this is certainly not a banana republic. what we've seen is an entangling of media and politicians and police, a kind of causeuasi new establishment with roles not being clearly enough defined. i think the second point to makeis that let's not forget britain has a very vibrant competitive press. and this story was exposed, not by a police inquire race, not by a parliamentary committee, but by a leading british newspaper "the guardian," helped a little bit by "the new york times," which crucially broke the story that broke the news internat
development, scotland yard released a statement accusing unnamed individuals of trying to sabotage its investigation. part of that probe involves allegations that murdoch journalists paid bribes to police for information. rescuers in russia searched a huge reservoir on the volga river today, after a cruise boat sank on sunday. at least 55 people were killed, with 79 rescued and dozens more missing. it happened about 450 miles east of moscow, in windy, rainy conditions. the boat sank in just eight minutes. today, debris was visible in the water as search boats looked for victims and survivors. families stood by, hoping for news. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn to africa where a nation is born, but with many troubles. at midnight friday in juba, the capital of the new south sudan, this sign said it all: "free at last". the turning of the clock to july 9, saturday, meant independence, and the creation of the world's newest nation. >> i am sending good luck to all the southern sudanese. >> woodruff: but the jubilation in the streets of
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)